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Tag: health


7 WAYS TO BREAK-UP WITH YOUR TOXIC JOB

7 WAYS TO BREAK-UP WITH YOUR TOXIC JOB

Posted September 23, 2013

I’m so thrilled to share with you this follow-up guest post from Kacey Crawford. Not so long ago Kacey wrote a post here called “Is your job making you sick?” And yep, it was HUGELY popular, to say the least. Kacey is now here to offer up some advice to those that were screaming YES upon reading that very first post.And she knows what she’s talking about – as an inspired Career + Life Coach, Kacey is all over it! In Kacey’s words: If you’re ready to ditch the job that’s dictating your social conversations and robbing you of health and happiness, then this is your much-needed what next. 1. Clarify your reasons for moving on. This step serves several important purposes. First, identifying what’s made you unhappy means you can look out for (and avoid) it in future job choices. For instance, if it’s unreasonable working hours, excessive workload or unrealistic deadlines that are stressing you out, you’ll want to target organisations that offer flexible work and employee wellbeing perks – and steer clear of high-pressure or commission-based jobs. This exercise will also help alleviate any guilt or disloyalty that may surface when it comes time to bid farewell. While the job itself may suck, you could be leaving behind a great group of colleagues, clients or a boss who is powerless to improve things for you. Seeing your reasons written down will reaffirm why you’re making this choice and help you stand your ground. And finally, this step will ensure you have a polished, diplomatic response to the inevitable interview question about why you’re moving on. 2. Get the practical stuff sorted. First cab off the rank is to brush up your resume, then put your referees on notice that you’ll be job-seeking soon. Check they’re still happy to vouch for you and help them understand what you’ve been doing so they can talk about you with confidence. I’ve written a handy guide on resume writing, interview skills and cover letters that you can get right here, and it includes handy tips on how to get the most from your referees. Sign up for email alerts on the major job-seeking search engines. Update your LinkedIn profile to reflect your most recent experience, not forgetting any qualifications, training or achievements that should be included. And if you’re on a performance-based bonus or incentive scheme at work, check when your payment is due and know what the eligibility rules are. You don’t want to rule yourself out of the running with an ill-timed resignation. Now is also the time to reconnect with your mentors and contacts and start networking. 3. Start to dial it down so you can recharge. While it’s important not to check out of your job entirely before you leave (I’m a big believer in not burning bridges), you also need to preserve your energy for your job search – and the learning curve involved with starting a new role. In a perfect world you’d have at least two weeks between leaving your role and starting the next one, but we all know that often doesn’t happen. Stay professional, maintain your integrity and aim to wrap up any substantial pieces of existing work, but now isn’t the time to be taking on anything new. 4. Put a transition plan in place. If you have clients, manage people or work in a specialist/technical role, it’s important that you start thinking about how you’ll hand over your responsibilities once you leave. Depending on the severity of your situation it can be hard to think this way, but it’s a simple and often overlooked way of upholding your professional image – not to mention just plain old good karma. Use this time to tie up loose ends, bed down any processes or important information that’s living inside your head, and do an email and hard drive clean out (which may provide helpful fodder for your resume too). 5. Decide how you’ll leave. For most people, financial responsibilities will require you to give the proper period of notice and wait it out to maintain salary continuity between roles. If you can afford to take leave without pay – and only you can be the judge of that – or exhaust the rest of your annual leave as part of your notice period (which some organisations allow), then go for it. You may even want to take a career break if your organisation offers them – but consider what impact this will have on your benefits and entitlements, including access to paid parental leave. Now is also a good time to decide if you’ll raise any issues or grievances in your exit interview. It’s a personal choice as to whether you do this, but remember to keep your comments professional and gracious. Think about whether your feedback is likely to have an impact and what the future repercussions could be for you personally (especially if you work in a small industry). Think self-preservation as opposed to short-term gratification. 6. Get some clear direction. When you’re seriously unhappy at work, your desperation to escape can easily lead you to bounce unintentionally from one dissatisfying role to another. Use this opportunity to get clear on exactly what you want to do next (given that you’ve now discovered what you don’t want). If you’ve been thinking about a career change or starting up a business, then now could be the perfect time. Most people contemplating career change will start by thinking “what could I do”, which leads them down a narrow path that includes only their skills and experience. Try a different approach: imagine the lifestyle you want and then identify careers that will allow you to have it. What specific types of roles and organisations match your vision? How can you make sure you target them in your job search? What types of questions might you need to ask in job interviews to ensure your next job really stacks up? Remember your next role […] Read more

8 WAYS TO LOVE YOUR ‘OTHER BRAIN’

8 WAYS TO LOVE YOUR ‘OTHER BRAIN’

Posted August 26, 2013

This is the first of the amazing guest posts that will be appearing on the blog while I’m away at the ONE Infinite Training Retreat. Please welcome Lee Holmes.  Lee recently won the BupaBlogAwards and rightly so. The work she does over at Supercharged Food is incredible. __________________________________________________________________________ I’m so excited at being asked by Claire to be a guest blogger for The Wellness Project. I love Claire’s blog  and find It full of rich content and inspiration. I’ve known Claire for a few years now and we both share a passion for wellness with deeply aligned philosophies when it comes to holistic health.  My book and blog, Supercharged Food helps people to make nutritious food and lifestyle choices; if you take a visit you’ll find healthy recipes, a shopping list, meal planner, cooking tips and wellness information. I hope you come and take a look and try out some of the recipes, here’s the address www.superchargedfood.com What I’d like to chat about this week is something that was at the very heart of my own healing from an auto-immune condition and a key aspect of my overall wellbeing.The importance of a healthy digestive system or “The other brain” as it is often referred to is the central point for effective functioning of other body systems. Did you know that serotonin is manufactured in the gut? And our enteric nervous system in our bellies goes far beyond just processing the food we eat. I would love to share with you my eight simple ways to improve your digestion and absorption. Not only is it important to eat healthy foods full of vitamins and minerals, but it’s also important to ensure your digestive system is able to take advantage of these foods through proper absorption. If you suffer from any kind of digestion stress – diarrhea, constipation, IBS, acid reflux or other disorders – you might want to try these tips to get yourself on the way to maintaining a healthy digestion. 1. Take probiotics Probiotics are a live microorganism that improve the balance of flora in the digestive system. For a healthy digestion these friendly bacteria are essential. They help prevent the overgrowth of bad bacteria and are often depleted if you’ve been taking antibiotics or if you’ve had gastro. Probiotics can be found in some yogurts (check there is no added sugar), or taken as supplements. 2. Use more coconut products Coconut oil contains lauric acid – a proven antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal agent that is easily digested and absorbed. The antifungal aspect helps kill candida in the gut, which is a common problem for people with digestive stress. Plus, coconut helps absorb beneficial nutrients from our food. 3. Soak your nuts and grains When you soak your nuts and grains you are reducing toxic substances and inhibitors that occur naturally within the grain. For example, phytic acid (found in most nuts, seeds and grains), will combine with minerals such as calcium, zinc and magnesium and prevent them from being absorbed during digestion. Soaking neutralises this natural inhibitor. 4. Do an elimination diet If you find you experience adverse affects after eating a particular food, it might be worthwhile trying an elimination diet. Remove the suspected food or food group from your diet for anywhere between two weeks and two months and see if symptoms resolve. 5. Try bone broth Your digestive lining is supposed to be permeable to absorb nutrients. But for some people it can become too porous and let too much “leak” through without absorbing it properly. When this happens, your body can react, attacking the foods you eat. This can create IBS and other gut problems, even some autoimmune disorders. Bone broth contains gelatin which helps reinforce the lining of the gut and soothe digestive distress. 6. Drink less with meals Drinking a lot of fluid (even water) while you eat can dilute the level of hydrochloric acid (HCL) in your stomach. This acid is needed to help kill bacteria and digest your foods. It’s best to minimise the fluid you drink while eat and for at least an hour after you finish your meal. 7. Drink warm water and lemon Along with a delicious breakfast, it’s a good idea to get into the habit of starting the day with a cup of warm water with lemon. This alkaline drink will help jump start your metabolism and get your digestion moving. 8. Chew your food If you’re a mum or dad, you probably tell your kids this all the time: chew your food! Chewing is the first step in food digestion. Try not to rush through your meal, but allow yourself plenty of time to chew, chew, chew before you swallow. Hope you enjoyed this post and thank you for having me! Happy Cooking Lee xo Find Lee here: share: www.superchargedfood.com like: www.facebook.com/superchargedfood tweet: www.twitter.com/LeeSupercharged blog: supercharged1.wordpress.com link: www.linkedin.com/in/leesupercharged watch: www.youtube.com/leeholmes67 Read more

THE ‘I CAN’T BELIEVE IT’S NOT REAL’ RAW CHOC MOUSSE

THE ‘I CAN’T BELIEVE IT’S NOT REAL’ RAW CHOC MOUSSE

Posted December 24, 2012

Yep, the title of this post says it all. Raw, creamy, moorish, delicious, indulgent chocolate mousse that is so far from the real (naughty, sugar-laden, unhealthy) version they may as well be from different planets. It’s good. And not in that ‘if you frown and purse your lips it almost tastes good’ kind of way that some raw foods claim their fame. This is good enough to fool my partner, who is my measuring stick… If he loves it then I know you amazing foodies will swoon over it. You’d think I have a really insane sweet tooth but I mostly enjoy the experience of enjoying a treat that is so good for me. I feel like I have a little secret, I almost feel smug. So here it is. You want chocolate, you want mousse, you want delicious, mostly you want healthy? I bring you this: RAW CACAO & AVOCADO MOUSSE Ingredients: 1.5-2 Ripe Hass Avocaodos 3 heaped tbls of cacao 2-3 heaped tbls of coconut cream (take from the top of a can of coconut cream after its been in the fridge) 1 tbls vanilla powder/vanilla bean/pure vanilla extract 1 teaspoon stevia or 1-2 tbls of raw honey Blend until you have a glossy, thick, firm mousse. Refrigerate immediately. When ready serve with fresh fruit, crushed nuts or enjoy on its own. This is such a lovely treat to enjoy for Christmas with a bowl of cherries to dip in with. Not to mention how super impressed your family and friends will be. I promise, with the right ratio of ingredients the avocado is undetectable. So play around with the balance if you need to but up the vanilla, cacao and coconut before the honey. The less sugar the better. Enjoy. Saha to you, CX Read more

MAKE THIS: COCO-NUTTY BROWNIE

MAKE THIS: COCO-NUTTY BROWNIE

Posted November 28, 2012

So, I was getting a little sick of bliss balls… but I wanted something for those sweet-tooth moments or a little something easy I could snack on for a little extra energy. I played around with the bliss ball recipe and a few others I saw online and the end results was this: A dense, super-chocolatey, coconut infused nut brownie. Delicious! No added sugar. Gluten, dairy + yeast free. Here’s what you’ll need: 1 tbls tahini 3 dates (pre-soaked to rehydrate) 2 tbls of the date juice (from soaking) 1 cup of mixed activated nuts 1/2 cup of coconut flakes 3 tbls cold-pressed organic coconut oil (melted) 3 heaped tbls of cacao Cinnamon to taste What to do: Blend the nuts, dates, date juice and oil first until a nice. One by one add in the cacao, then the coconut flakes (use only 1/4), tahini and cinnamon. You should have a thick consistency that can easily be formed into a firm shape. Add in anything else you want – get fancy if you like (I sometimes add in goji berries, maca or spirulina). Take the rest of the coconut flakes and whizz in the blender until really fine (you might need to clean the blender first) and then sprinkle onto baking paper lining a low tupperware container or dish. Press the mixture into the container/ dish lined and sprinkle on some more coconut flakes and cinnamon. Voila! Enjoy with coconut cream + berries as a dessert. Have as a breakfast on-to-go brownie or afternoon snack with some chai tea. YUM. Saha to you and enjoy! Cx Read more

EAT THIS: CHIA COCONUT + MANGO PUDDING

EAT THIS: CHIA COCONUT + MANGO PUDDING

Posted November 19, 2012

It’s summer, oh yeah! Hands up who wants something chilled, nourishing and stupidly easy to make? I know I do. How about a chilled chia pudding? Rather than rehash old information here’s a previous blog post I did on why Chia seeds are so good for you. Oh and it includes a bliss ball recipe too – bonus! Now, it took me a while to progress from basic chia user (adding to my smoothies) to a full-blown chia fan – mostly I was just lazy to try yet another thing. But I am SO glad that I eventually took the leap because as I sit here munching on this pudding all I can think is “chia, I love you”. So, enough from me and onto the recipe! What you’ll need: 2 tbls chia seeds 3 dates 1/2 cup coconut milk 1/4 cup activated nuts of your choice (I like walnuts, almonds, cashews – whatever I have) 1/2 of a mango cheek Cinnamon 2 tbls of finely ground coconut flakes or even the flesh 1 teaspoon coconut oil Water or coconut water – amount depends on consistency What to do: In a food processor/blender whiz up the dates, nuts, coconut oil, mango and cinnamon. Little by little add in the coconut milk and perhaps if it’s too think add in some water. Pour this runny liquid into a container and then mix in your chia seeds. You want the mixture to start to thicken up. Pop this into the fridge so the chia seeds can soak it all up. Overnight is best, or give it at least 30 minutes. When you are ready to eat then it sit out of the fridge for around 10 minutes to soften slightly. Serve with slices of mango and more cinnamon. If you liked that try some of these other recipes I posted a while back. Enjoy and saha to you! Claire x Read more

EXPERIMENT IN SURRENDER PT 4 – KA HUNA MASSAGE

EXPERIMENT IN SURRENDER PT 4 – KA HUNA MASSAGE

Posted November 12, 2012

Recently, despite making huge progress in my healing I felt my injuries (although very different to how they were before) play up a little.  As I was scanning through my body, trying to feel what it needed, Ka Huna massage popped into my mind. I immediately got in touch with the Sydney Ka Huna centre and booked in a session. My first experience of Ka Huna massage was a few years back at a yoga retreat and then again during my days in PR where I was researching ‘calming’ experiences for an event! Both experiences were incredibly different but powerful. One time I spent the majority of the massage sobbing. Yep, not just weeping or crying softly, but sobbing like a child from some deep place within. I spoke to Nemara, the founder of Ka Huna massage and a women very passionate about this modality. She was able to give me further insights into Ka Huna. So, what exactly is Ka Huna? First off, we all know the phrase, ‘The Big Ka-Huna’. Ka Huna in the Hawaiian culture references someone that is a master in whichever field – counselling, coaching, teaching, engineering, sales etc. It is someone that is able to impart MORE than just the necessary information and experience. Now, apply this to what Ka Huna means – Ka – The Light and Huna – Secrets. This basically means shedding light or wisdom. Or as the Sydney Ka Huna centre puts it: “the knowledge and wisdom that is beyond what we can see in our everyday lives”. Ka Huna is a massage technique that is truly holistic. With long-flowing movements that replicate the ocean, deep breathing techniques and hula dance movements, you won’t just be kneading and pummeled. You will be loved and you will feel true presence in mind, body and breath. What is it about? Well, the Ka Huna was designed to impart deeply loving and healing touch. It is as much about personal development and healing as it is about the physical massage. Different to other massage techniques, Ka Huna is a holistic healing modality working with the whole person and all their layers. Ka Huna taps into something called Aloha Energy or Love Energy. Which is the unconditional, infinite love that we all have within us – where we come from and what are all part of. The therapist is trained to come from a place of non-judgement, moving from their heart and embracing the beauty of each person. This allows them to connect on a ‘truth’ level and not just a physical plane. You’ll notice that the therapist seems energised at the end of the massage, not depleted or drained – that’s because they are tapping into that energy as you are too. To move even deeper into it, Ka Huna is threaded through universal principles that transcend time and culture. These are not ‘Hawaiian’ philosophies, they are just in Hawaiian words: KE (ee-kay) The world is what you think it is Be Aware KALA (kah-lah) There are no limits Be Free MAKIA (mah-kee-ah) Energy flows where attention goes Be Focused MANAWA (mah-nah-wah) Now is the moment of power Be Here ALOHA (ah-lo-hah) To love is to be happy (the joyful sharing of Love energy in the present) Be Happy MANA (mah-nah) All power comes from within Be Confident PONO (poh-noh) Effectiveness is the measure of truth Be Positive Follow this link to delve further into understanding these 7 principles of Ka Huna. What is involved in the massage? I was going to leave this part out, and hopefully just encourage you to try it for yourself. The less expectations you have the better.  But for the purpose of education I’m going to give you some detail. Be open-minded and let go of your pre-conceived ideas about massage before you read on! Depending on the practitioner you might start with a quick chat about how you are feeling physically/mentally and emotionally. You may pull a tarot card even or just have a few moments of silence on your own. Next, you will lie on your belly on an unclothed massage table, totally nude but covered by a sarong. Your therapist will quietly enter the room and may begin a deep breathing technique that sounds like the wind, ocean or a deep sigh. There might even be chanting. Next, whilst still covered the therapist will slowly warm your body up – stretch out your arms and legs so you are pretty much spread-eagled on the bed. The sarong will be folded up to cover your private parts below, but that’s it, you are essentially naked – this is such a lovely feeling; liberated, raw, vulnerable but safe and comfortable. The massage will involve long sweeping strokes that might move from your feet, up your legs, under your belly and over your shoulders. I describe this as a big, warm, oily hug. Your body will literally be lathered in oil as the therapist uses their elbows, arms, forearms, and hands to manipulate, soothe and caress you. It’s surprisingly strong but never painful. Eventually you’ll turn over and the process will continue on your front side. Often the therapists hands will come up underneath your spine to create a deep yet gentle back-bend which feels amazing or give you a thorough head massage. All the while still breathing deeply. Your torso might be stretched to hang over the sides of the massage bed whilst the therapist supports your body – massaging your belly, head, neck, face. You might sense (unless you open your eyes) that the therapist is performing dance movements around you – these are hula movements. To finish, you’ll be wrapped up with warmed blankets, heat packs and left to slowly come back to reality. I cannot actually describe this properly. However the key elements are to TRUST, LET GO, BREATH deeply and in harmony with your therapist and OPEN yourself up. It’s an incredibly intimate and very, very loving experience if you allow it to […] Read more

6 LIFE LESSONS FROM BALI

6 LIFE LESSONS FROM BALI

Posted November 02, 2012

So, as you might know I was recently in Bali. I had an amazing experience – attending a friend’s wedding, scooting around Seminyak, eating amazing food. But what really stands out for me was my trip up to Ubud. The spiritual centre of Bali, likened to a little India. We headed up to Ubud to experience something different from the tourist strips  – western hotel pools, beach clubs, sydney-priced shopping – and surprisingly the drive to and from Ubud was where I learnt the most about Bali. Having hired a driver to take me to Chokorda Rai (a local healer – more on that in another post) I didn’t expect that the driver, himself, would offer up so many nuggets of spiritual insight. Pearls of wisdom and if I may I’d like to share these with you today. His name was Putu. He was a gentle, kind and open souland clearly, as most Balinese do, sees the world in a different way to most of us. Here are a few life lessons from Putu and a few notes from myself. 1) Just go with the flow. If everything is heading in one direction, you have to decide if it makes sense to turn around and swim against the current. So, if going in that direction doesn’t make sense, first, step out of the way and take a moment to be still. Figure out what it is you want, where you want to go. Don’t just do an about face and head backwards. You’ll just end up fighting against the flow. 2) Balance is important. It’s everything. Every person has their place, their role and everything has a place, a role. Sticking to this creates harmony in the long term. We were talking about positions within the family and the ‘compound’ – the Balinese way of living – and Putu provided insight into the necessity of create balance within the family environment and within the roles. For example, the mother has a clearly defined role – to care for and raise the children and run the household. The father – the breadwinner, the decision maker. A very traditional structure, but Putu’s insight  was intriguing -“the father is tired from working, so if he gets too involved with the matters of the children he will rule them with anger and frustration. It’s better that the mother disciplines and raises the children because her approach is softer and will not damage the children”, 3) Read the eyes. Trust your instincts and respond to what you sense, not just what you see. Then you can follow the instructions after. I asked Putu how he avoids serious accidents in such crazy traffic (Bali has serious traffic jams!) He responded that he notices the street signs around him second to the eyes of his fellow drivers/riders. “Their eyes will tell you what they want and where they want to go. You can do this in any situation. Not just when driving” 4) Don’t be mad. Don’t be mad at the street. Why be mad at something that only just that morning you asked it to protect you and guide you. If I am mad at the street I am bringing bad luck to me. Again, talking traffic, I mentioned that road rage in Australia was much more apparent than Bali, despite how much worse their situation is. Putu, straight to the point, explained the Baliness belief in remaining calm in the face of frustation and testing times. A spiritual way of living with the knowledge that like attracts like. Your anger, in traffic or anywhere else, will only bring you more of the same. 5) We must always ask for a lucky day. It will bring us happiness and love. We were chatting about marriage, buying homes and more. Putu explained the Balinese culture of choosing an auspicious day from a local priest to ensure that luck was always on your side. It made me realise that we don’t tend to connect with anything higher than ourselves – because perhaps many of us don’t believe that everything is connected as the Balinese do. 6) Just relax. Don’t worry. This doesn’t help anything. After visiting a healer, which had me in tears, we were discussing my diagnosis over Lawak (coffee from the mongoose cat!) Apparently ‘worry’ coming up quite strong within my body. Putu very calmly told me – in the same tone as one would say “take the 372 to coogee’ – that worrying is pointless. Just let life happen, worrying isn’t life. It does nothing good. It’s an understatement to say that Putu had me thinking, alot. Some of his little pearls were so simple, things I had read/heard many times but it was in his delivery. This calm, matter-of-fact way that made me realise he wasn’t reciting some concept he understood intellectually, in theory. He was sharing his life practice. The Balinese way of living and being. I can’t wait to go back so I can explore this complex, yet simple culture even more. Have you been to Bali and experience the people and the culture? Did you learn anything that you still remember today? Saha to you, Claire Read more

MY EXPERIMENT IN SURRENDER PT3 – ACUPUNCTURE

MY EXPERIMENT IN SURRENDER PT3 – ACUPUNCTURE

Posted October 26, 2012

With a small hamstring strain, lower back injury, shoulder strain and trying to fight the lurgy that was flying around I was keen to try something… anything! I remembered my osteo had previously told me about this fantastic organisation – Experienced Community Acupuncture – who provide 1 hour treatments for $25 with experienced acupuncturists. Experienced Community Acupuncture (ECA) is passionate about making acupuncture accessible to the general public. And I think that is a noble thing to do. My dad used to suffer from severe back pain after spending hours, alone all day at work, lifting and carrying heavy boxes. Acupuncture was the only thing that made a difference for him – but the cost of it was often a boundary. ECA moves to different suburbs throughout the week making it even more accessible and at $25 a pop, what do you have to lose? Well, that’s what I thought… and I lost nothing. In fact, I gained an education into Chinese Medicine and it certainly helped to alleviate the pain in my body. The needles didn’t necessarily hurt as they were inserted but I was told that there were quite strong blockages in certain areas due to the intensity of the ‘ache’ I would feel during some of the sessions. Particularly with anything related to my back. I’m looking forward to going again to see if these have cleared. To bring to life acupuncture a little more Ray Ford from ECA has kindly answered a few questions which I hope will give you a clearer picture. What is acupuncture? The word acupuncture can be divided into two parts “acu” which means needle and puncture. Therefore acupuncture is the insertion of the tips of very fine sterile needles into the body at strategic sites. What is qi and meridian channels? Qi is the vital force that flows in the channels/meridians and enervates the body it is also translated as “vapor” suggesting an essence derived from food which supports, sustains and nourishes the body. The channels OR meridians are energetic pathways that flow in set patterns within the human organism. The Chinese have identified and mapped the meridians for at least two thousand years.  How do these affect our day to day lives? Qi travels in the 12 main channels and does one complete cycle every 24 hours. Each channel has a high energetic “tide” of 2 hours.When there are problems, blockages or deficiencies it will often show up in the body at the time appropriate to the channel or organ involved.It may also show up in the opposite 12 hour period.An example is that people with a Liver disharmony often wake up between 1-3 am which is the high point of the Liver energy.  Can you describe an acupuncture session An acupuncture session involves the practitioner listening to the patient, looking at signs such as complexion and asking about symptoms. The pulse is taken to assess disharmony and where it may be located, the tongue is observed to reveal the condition of the digestive and inner organs. The abdomen or other parts of the body may be palpated to check for restriction or tenderness.  After this, a diagnosis can be made and acupuncture points will be chosen that are known to balance the particular imbalance/pain/injury that is present. As acupuncture stimulates the body’s internal regulatory system, acupuncture points can stimulate a natural healing response without directly having to treat the site on an injury or imbalance. This is why points may be far away from the area involved in the injury /illness. Why the use of needles? What effect does this actually have. Needles are use because they are metal which have the effect of conducting the energy in the body, redirecting or unblocking it. Acupuncture has an advantage over manual systems that do not use needles in that with acupuncture we can combine several points at the same time. How can someone be sure that their practitioner is good? Practitioners must be a member of a recognized association that has standards of competency. The public are entitled to ask the practitioner about their experience and qualifications so they can make an informed decision. This may also be on their website if they have one, in other words look into a practitioners education,qualifications and experience. Acupuncture is an acquired skill taking years to refine. Reading the classics or pulse diagnosis take time, dedication and application to master. By application I mean having the experience of actually performing many thousands of treatments to gain experience, this cannot be fudged, there are no short cuts. Are there any risks? In the hands of competent experienced and well trained practitioners acupuncture is a very safe procedure. What are some of the results you have witnessed yourself? I have witnessed breech babies turning many times. Prolapsed lumbar discs which were said to need surgery have moved back into place after acupuncture verified with MRI. Completely healing debilitating migraine headaches in some patients some of whom had been suffering for more than 20 years Many cases of “infertility”  in women and men as diagnosed by western medicine have been “reversed” with acupuncture and resulted in numerous healthy children over the years. Immune system disorders and allergies helped significantly Debilitating neck, back, shoulder pain completely removed. What is the history of acupuncture? The History of Chinese Medicine in general goes back at least 4000 years and even as far back as the mythological Xia Dynasty. I think it is such as vast subject that cannot be answered in a question and answer format such as this. I think if I did that most of your readers would be asleep or in a deep trance. Some people have taken four years and obtained a PHD and only slightly answered this question so you can see its a very big topic. (I suggest a google search if you are keen to know more!) Learning how to surrender with needles in you was a task in itself, but long […] Read more

MY EXPERIMENT IN SURRENDER PT 2 – KINESIOLOGY

MY EXPERIMENT IN SURRENDER PT 2 – KINESIOLOGY

Posted October 19, 2012

So, during my little experiment in surrender I made sure I explored other modalities of healing – partly to give me something to put my energy into but also because I’d finally gotten serious about my healing. First stop, Kinesiology. Before I go any further, let me tell you that even I was a little unsure/cynical about kinesiology. But when you are in a session it’s hard to deny the clear messages your body is sending. By my second session I felt light, floaty even. Like a weight had been lifted from my shoulders. I have felt less anxious and stressed and my physical injuries have improved. I discovered some surprising, but profound things during my kinesiology sessiosn: On some deep level I didn’t believe in my own achievements nor did I feel proud of myself. Let me tell you – I should, I’ve worked hard and achieved alot. But still, I had this core belief inside of me that needed shifting. And shift it did. I was also sabotaging myself. Huh? Why, do we do this to ourselves. FEAR. Always, fear. And again, kinesiology has helped me accept and shift it too. So, let’s take a look at Kinesiology – even the word is weird. I was going to detail, blow-by-blow my experience, but instead I’ve asked a professional to help. Let’s face it, this one is very complex and deserves to be explained properly! I had my Kinesiologist, the lovely Kimberley Pipe, answer a few questions for you. Her explanations do it much better justice than what I would. __________________________________________________________________________________________ Can you explain what Kinesiology is in a way that everyone can understand? Kinesiology is a method using muscle feedback and body awareness that can clear blockages in your body and help to reduce stress and pain, improving performance in all areas of your life, promoting good health and well-being. Kinesiology uses the chi energy flow around the body, which flows through meridians.  Muscles are indicators for these meridians. Kinesiology works with this energy and taps into the body to allow it to heal itself. Our body has it’s own innate healing ability! Why do you believe in it – what have you witnessed during sessions? I have had Kinesiology sessions for 12 years and it has changed my life. Kinesiology really resonates with me because it deals with all aspects of our lives – emotional, physical and nutrition and the results I get never cease to amaze and inspire me. The reason I believe in Kinesiology is because I can see how the body reacts using different testing on different areas of the body – particularly when you are also thinking different things. Because I can also show the client this, there is something visible you can see and measure. I have had sessions with clients where they have completely transformed their lives.  I have one client who achieved everything she set out to do at her first session. I went to see her perform and she told me I had such a huge part in her success. What are the benefits of kinesiology? And who can benefit from it? The benefits of Kinesiology is that it can heal any aspect of your body and mind. Whether it is emotional, physical or biochemical (nutrition). Kinesiology can help you shift old patterns, which may be holding you back, to allow you to create the life you want to live, and achieve what it is you want to in life. Kinesiology is for any layperson. It is individual to the client’s problems, issues, blocks and life experiences. How did you become a kinesiologist and why? I first stumbled across Kinesiology in 2003, in my hometown of Auckland, New Zealand.  I thought that it was the most beneficial and effective modality I had experienced. Moving to the UK shortly after, I took the opportunity to really immerse myself in this healing art, and in so doing, discovered a valuable and effective tool for dealing with issues. Continuing in my personal development, and working closely with other Kinesiologists I realised that I, too, had a drive to help people achieve the most out of their life, by helping them to overcome obstacles and trauma. I have my Certificate IV and Diploma in Kinesiology and studied at the Australasian College of Kinesiology Mastery. Alot of people think it’s a bunch of voodoo how would you convince someone of the power of kinesiology? The role of the Kinesiologist is to act as the mediator when there is a breakdown in communication between the body and the mind. I would show them an example of muscle testing, which is evidence in itself and nothing beats an actual session. Anything else you want to add? Since I became a full time Kinesiologist I have not looked back. Every day I get to see the power of people and the amazing doors that Kinesiology helps open. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ So, what do you think? Are you intrigued by Kinesiology? Or have you already experienced amazing results? I would love to hear your thoughts and get a different perspective or learn from your experience. Saha to you, Claire x Read more


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