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5 WAYS TO ENJOY TURMERIC FOR HEALING

5 WAYS TO ENJOY TURMERIC FOR HEALING

Posted July 18, 2013

Every year I get a cold of some sort. I used to get 3 or 4 when I was younger. I definitely used to be way out of balance. Now I like to see this annual cold as a reminder that I need to slow down and an immune system ‘refresh’. As a health coach and a yoga teacher I need to frequently top-up my knowledge bank through studying, workshops and courses. I like to see my little colds as my immune systems way of ‘topping up’ and getting up to scratch with all the new bugs out there and rebulding its defense system! That being said, I also see my little annual cold as a chance to practice what I preach. No drugs – no cold and flu tablets. Nothing but healing through natural remedies. Amongst the arsenal that I use – seriously, I bring out all the stops – I get very cosy with turmeric. I try and use turmeric on a daily basis, but it’s exceptionally powerful when you are run down! Turmeric – this little golden nugget is such a gem (puns intended) and I just had to share with you it’s incredible healing power. So, what makes turmeric so special? It’s the active ingredient Curcumin which does all the wondrous work. Turmeric is also armed up with a wide range of antioxidant, antiviral,  antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, and anti-inflammatory properties. That is alot of ‘ANTI’s’. Not to mention Vitamins C, E, K and a host of awesome minerals too. What are some natural benefits of turmeric? When it comes to colds/flus turmeric helps by: alleviating coughs clearing mucus and congestion opening the passageways to breather easier reduces inflammation/sore throats There are so many other benefits though: Improves digestion by producing bile which helps breakdown fat. When are digestion is off so is our immune systems Relieves symptoms of gas and bloating Wards off inflammatory diseases and prevent cancer Drops blood sugar levels – great for diabetes sufferers Speeds up wound healing Improves asthma Clears skin conditions Purifies the blood Aids in weight management 4 Ways to enjoy turmeric for health and healing: Add grated turmeric root to your food – add to soups, stews, stir-frys and curries Steam under a towel over a bowl of hot water with turmeric root or powder added in to clear nasal passages and upper respiratory tract Make a traditional ayurvedic tea to relieve colds and congestion: boil up 1tsp turmeric, 2 black peppercorns, 1inch grated ginger, 2 cracked cardamom pods in rice milk (raw dairy or almond is good too). Add to a green smoothie: 1 handful of greens (kale/silverbeet/chard), 1/2 lemon, 1 inch of ginger, 1 inch of turmeric root or 2 tsp of powder, 1 cup of coconut water, 2 tbls of chia seeds, 1/2 green apple, 2tbls of coconut oil, 1 heaped tsp of green power (I love Good Green Stuff from Nu Zest or Super Greens from Synergy Natural are my favourite!) For extra protein I add Sunwarrior brown rice protein powder. Turmeric face mask: to clear acne.2tsp of turmeric powder, 2 tsps of lemon juice, 1 tbls of yoghurt. Apply the past evenly leave for 15 minutes. Wash off with cool water. Your turn: Do you use turmeric often? Share below so we can all discover new ways to use this amazing herb! love + light, Claire Read more

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: LEMONY LENTIL SOUP

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: LEMONY LENTIL SOUP

Posted July 08, 2013

I rediscovered this soup a few years back during an anatomy + physiology class. During our lunch break I took myself off to a cafe for a feed and I almost tripped over when I saw “Lebanese Lentil Soup” written on the chalk-board. I got a little excited. I crossed my fingers  hoping it’d be the soup I knew all to well from my childhood. Bingo. I couldn’t get over. It tasted just like home. And since that day I have made this soup all through Autumn and Winter. I have even shared the recipe with my friends because it’s that easy and delicious. What could be more Middle Eastern than lentils, lemons, spinach, cumin and garlic! Before I share this with you I want give you a little tip to prevent bloating or gas from the lentils.  For all you IBS sufferers who probably avoid lentils for that very reason, listen up! This is my mother’s trick and it works. Presoak your lentils – the longer the better. If you soak them in the morning and then cook at night, that’ll do the trick Next, thoroughly rinse in cold water Finally, in a seperate pot bring the lentils to a boil for 1-2 minutes. Drain, rinse and then use the lentils in your recipe. Now, I share it with you. What you’ll need 1 cup brown/green lentils – soaked overnight 3-4 medium sized potatoes – washed, peeled and diced into cubes 2-3 cups chopped spinach/silverbeet 1 cup coriander 1/2 cup lemon juice 2-3 garlic cloves – diced 2 brown onions – diced Cultured butter Olive Oil Salt + Pepper 1 heaped tsp of Cumin + All spice 1 litre homemade veggie stock (I use left over peelings, cuttings from veggies and boil up – then freeze into cubes or bottles for later use) What to do: In the butter and olive oil sweat off the onion, add the garlic, a dash of cumin, salt and pepper. Throw in the lentils and coat in the olive oil. Add the veggie stock and potatoes, simmer for 20 minutes until the potatoes are soft but not falling apart. Turn off the heat, let it cool for 2-3 minutes Throw in the spinach and coriander, allow to wilt. Sprinkle in more cumin, salt + pepper to taste. Pour in lemon juice Serve with an additional garnish of coriander and a slice of delicious gluten-free bread (I’m enjoying buckwheat bread at the moment). You can blend this all up if you prefer a thicker consistency but the broth contrasted against the potatoes and the zing of the lemon is perfect. Seriously, every single time I eat this I can’t help but (uncontrollably) let out a big sigh and close my eyes with the first mouthful. It’s just so soothing. Saha to you. Cx Read more

ONE POT WONDER: CINNAMON LEMON CHICKEN

ONE POT WONDER: CINNAMON LEMON CHICKEN

Posted July 01, 2013

Welcome to foodie heaven. Ok – that’s a bit dramatic, but if you are anything like me the smell of cinnamon (and all spices) sends you to a very happy place. Now, this little creation came about a few Friday nights ok. My husband and I have started a new winter ‘date night in’. This is how it goes: We each find and decide on a recipe we want to try We book in date night for Friday evening We cook TOGETHER in the kitchen This is a big deal in our relationship for multiple reasons. 1) Food is at the centre of it all (culturally we both come from ‘foodie people’. 2) We rarely fight anymore, but when we used to it was always about cooking  – who was in control, who knew how to do it better … etc, etc! So cooking together is reflective of where our relationship is now. Harmony! 3) We struggle eating out when we know how good our food is at home – we like the experience of trying new things together and sharing a meal. So – first cab off the rank was this decadent, spiced chicken one pot wonder. We saw the recipe on some SBS cooking show and decided to have a go – and of course, change it up a bit. Before we get to it, make sure halfway through cooking this meal you sneak a whiff! Take the lid off and breathe in the delicious, heavenly scent. You’ll get what I’m talking about! What you’ll need Chicken thighs (pastured, organic please!) 1kg Butter or ghee for frying (organic and whole milk!) 2 red onions, diced 5 cloves of garlic, diced 12cm cinnamon stick, broken into 4 pieces (find cinnamon BARK preferably, otherwise the quills are fine too) ½ tsp turmeric 1 tbsp ground coriander 1 tsp ground allspice 4-5 large tomatoes, cut into chunks 40g raisins, soaked in boiling water and drained about 500ml chicken stock (homemade preferably otherwise get a good quality one, it’s worth it) 2 small lemons cut into chunks 2 handfuls of coriander leaves, roughly chopped 2 cups of tri-coloured quinoa, pre-soaked and cooked until fluffy and light. What to do: Preheat the oven to 180C Season the chicken well with salt and pepper Heat butter/ghee on the pan and brown the chicken in batches. Remove the chicken and put to one side. Add another dollop of butter/ghee . Add onions and cook gently for a few minutes before adding the garlic and the spices. Cook for another 10 minutes until onions are soft. Add the chicken in, tomatoes, lemon and raisins. Pour in enough stock to come halfway to 3/4 up the pot. Boil and then reduce to a simmer. Place the lid on and leave it on low-medium for a good 1hr or so until the chicken is tender. Turn the heat off, add in the coriander and stir through. Serve the quinoa in a bowl with the chicken and soupy yummyness on top. Be sure to remove the cinnamon bits. We felt that this recipe needed more greens (we eat alot of green veg) so you could add in some zucchini, kale or silverbeet quite nicely. Saha to you! Cx Read more

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: POMEGRANATE GLAZED SALMON WITH FENNEL + MINT SALAD

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: POMEGRANATE GLAZED SALMON WITH FENNEL + MINT SALAD

Posted June 17, 2013

There are a few flavours that I absolutely love and remind me of home. Pomegranate Mint My parents garden is FILLED with fresh mint growing wildly. My beautiful mum would used to (in fact, still does) pick some mint from outside and bring it to me and say “smell this, smell how fresh and alive this is!” To this day the smell of mint always calms me down, like a lungful of fresh air makes you feel centred. Pomegranate, in middle eastern cultures represents fertility and love. On my wedding day all our guests huddled around me as I very elegantly (not quite) hiked my wedding dress up and did my best to squash and smash a whole pomegranate with my foot (yep, I was still in my heels!) All in the name of love and babies! So, today I bring you this middle eastern inspired dish. Honestly, it doesn’t have a name, I made it up based on the flavours I grew up on and what my taste buds were calling for! And they were calling for light, fresh and wholesome without being too heavy. I tend to reach for more protein during the cooler months but every now and then I need to ‘lighten the load’… you might be feeling the same! This gorgeous meal is perfect for a Sunday lunch or a midweek dinner. The best bit? The flavours are sensational, but it’s so easy to whip up! The middle eastern inspiration comes from the fresh salad with zingy flavours and the use of mint and pomegranate. You are going to HEART this so much. Enjoy! What you’ll need 2 medium sized salmon fillets (skin on) 1 large fennel – finely diced 1 pomegranate – cut in half and deseeded (I hold the 1/2 under water in a bowl and push the seeds out and then gently tap the back with a spoon to release the rest. You can use your fingers to ease out any stuck ones too) 1 bunch of asparagus, diced. 1/2 bunch of mint, roughly torne 2 tsp of Pomegranate concentrate/molasses (you can buy this in middle eastern stores!) Coconut oil 2 Lemons Salt, pepper,  cumin and cayenne pepper What to do: Preheat the oven to 160 degrees Heat some coconut oil in a pan, medium to high heat. Quickly coat your salmon (both sides in the melted oil) and then sear for about 3 minutes both sides. Take the salmon off the stove and glaze your salmon (both sides) in a mixture of 1sp pomegranate concentrate, a decent squeeze of 1/2 lemon, a dash of cumin. Pop the salmon into your oven for around 10 – 15 minutes. You want it to be cooked properly but soft and flaky in the inside, so perhaps check it at the 10 minute mark, depending on how strong your oven is/isn’t. Place your diced fennel and asparagus into a colander over boiling water. Steam for around 5 minutes – 10 minutes. When the fish is done, turn off the oven and open the door – let it sit like that for a moment. Toss your salad together: Fennel, asparagus, mint, pomegranate seeds. Dress with a the juice of 1 lemon, a dash of olive oil, apple cider vinegar and pomegranate concentrate, lots of pepper, a kick of cumin and tiny sprinkle cayenne pepper! Saha (good health) to you! Claire x Read more

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: SLOW COOKED SPICED LAMB + EGGPLANT STEW

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: SLOW COOKED SPICED LAMB + EGGPLANT STEW

Posted June 03, 2013

Oh I love me some lamb in the winter time. It’s nourishing, filling, satisfying and makes my body feel ‘cared for’ in the colder months. My body does not work on a full vegetarian diet. Depending on the season I can sometimes go MONTHS without meat, but at a certain point I will get a clear signal that it’s time to eat meat again. That’s my body and I believe it’s heavily influenced from my culture and heritage. Have you ever really looked at your heritage, body type, health and digestion to understand what really works best for you? As I’ve mentioned before, Middle Eastern cuisine is heavily based on lamb. It’s the staple meat and they KNOW how to cook it right. Slow, soft, pull-apart deliciousness. I had a chat to my mum on the phone to get this recipe right and she basically said I just had to trust myself and keep an eye on it. Let it happen slowly… My mum is such an intuitive cook that it’s hard to get directions off her because she just ‘feels’ her way through each recipe. Here we have my take on a lamb stew that my mother makes often. I’m serving it with brown rice instead of basmati and I’m including a few additional veggies that don’t normally feature. You can change this up as much as you want too! Lamb + Eggplant stew What you’ll need: 600 – 800 grams of lamb shoulder on the bone – ask your butcher for the best cut and have it cut up into small chunks for you 5-6 whole organic tomatoes 1 large eggplant 1 large green capsicum 2 – 3 zucchinis 2 -3 brown onions 3 garlic cloves Allspice or Cumin, Sumac, Coriander – any spices you have that are middle eastern inspired are great! 1 tbls organic tomato paste (look for the ones that are 100% tomato and nothing else) Water Brown Rice 3 lge tbls of organic cultured butter or ghee Just a side note here: I LOVE that I have a local butcher that serves grass-fed and pastured produce and that I can get what I need, know where it’s come from and have a little chat… it’s so divinely old school. If you can strike up a relationship with a good butcher it makes the world of difference. What to do: First rub some spices into your lamb and let it come to room temperature Heat the butter/ghee and brown off the lamb in a large pot Next toss in the onions and garlic, and stir-through Blend up all the tomatoes in a thick, chunky mixture and chuck into the pot. Add in all the veggies – diced into a small chunks Mix everything together and season to taste – I am very liberal and unstructured with my seasoning so aim for at least 2 tsps of spice, if not more! Mix 2 cups of water with the tomato paste and pour into the pot. You can also use your own homemade veggie stock here too. You want to almost cover the veggies/lamb but not drown it. Bring it all to a nice simmer and then drop it down and keep it on the stove at a low-ish heat for at least 1.5hrs. Cook up your brown rice with sliced onions through it To serve: plonk your brown rice in a bowl with the stew on top – use a slotted spoon so you strain some excess liquid out. Served with a bowl of yoghurt on the side. Eat and enjoy! Saha to you, Cx Read more

SWEET POTATO + CACAO PALEO SLICE

SWEET POTATO + CACAO PALEO SLICE

Posted May 27, 2013

Some call this a brownie, others call it a cake. Call it what you will, it’s just damn delicious! I’ve mentioned before how much I love sweet potatoes. So comforting and delicious, not to mention naturally sweet. If you are in the process of quitting sugar,t eventually, root veggies like the sweet potato will be oh-so-sweet to you. AND, the best bit, you can make pretty awesome things with the humble sweetest of potatoes. I was on the hunt for a little snack. Something I could have with a cup of tea at 3:30pm on those days I really need a pick-me-up. I’m not a huge snacker because I work from home and can enjoy three decent meals, but every now and then I love a little something spesh. I’ll bet if you are a 9-5er, a mum, a uni student (anyone!) that this little Paleo Slice will be exactly what you need to curb cravings, get an extra hit of protein and feel nicely satiate. It’s sugar-free It’s protein packed It’s vegetarian (vegans use chia seeds instead of eggs!) It’s gluten-free Ohhh yes. Does that make you as happy as it makes me?! What you’ll need: 3 eggs 1/4 cup melted coconut oil – cold pressed EV 1 tbls of rice malt syrup or raw honey if you don’t have it. 1 scoop of chocolate Sunwarrior protein power (vanilla and natural work fine too) 3 tbs coconut flour 1 tsp gluten free baking powder 1 large sweet potato 3 tbls raw cacao powder Lashing of cinnamon What to do. Peel and dice the sweet potato, toss in coconut oil Bake in the oven for 30 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile mix all the above DRY ingredients together and all the wet ingredients in a separate bowl. When the sweet potato is ready, blend or mash up. Add to the wet ingredients, then mix the dry ingredients in. Make sure it’s mixed really well. Spread into a low cake tin/baking tray (using baking paper so it doesn’t stick). Bake at 180 for 30 minutes. Optional topping: Melt cacao, butter and rice malt syrup for a chocolatey topping. Try my Healthy Nutella mix . OR mix cacao, rice malt syrup and yoghurt. Add onto the brownie once it’s cooled and then refrigerate. Enjoy as a snack with a peppermint tea, a breakfast option or even a dessert! Eat and enjoy. Claire x Read more

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: LAMB KAFTA

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: LAMB KAFTA

Posted May 20, 2013

In the Middle East, lamb is a staple within the diet. And it’s something I most definitely grew up on! The key here, with Middle Eastern cuisine is the QUALITY of the produce. It must be organic, grass-fed/pastured. Today I’m going to guide you through how to make my mother’s famous Kafta. You’ve probably heard of it before and perhaps even tried it, but this recipe is so stupidly delicious you’ll want to make it over and over and over. The best way for me to describe Kafta? It’s The Middle East’s version of the Aussie Sausage.  Incredibly healthy, clean + nourishing. Now, just a little note. I know there are hundreds of blog posts focusing on Meat-Free Monday’s. Please know I’m  totally cool with that. I do eat a predominantly plant-based diet, but I’m not a vegetarian – it just doesn’t work for my body type. In fact, the traditional Middle Eastern way of eating is like this – lots of veggies, fresh herbs and spices and meat sprinkled through a meal. I know some people think meat is something totally avoid. I disagree, unless it’s an ethical choice or you really, truly don’t function well on it. I think we don’t NEED as much meat as some people eat (but then again your cultural heritage comes in to play here too), but I do believe that meat can be incredibly health-giving. Protein, good fats, a way for all those vitamins and minerals to be ABSORBED… and more. The reason I am bringing this up is because meat, in my family, is seen as a life-source. Not something to abuse or over-use, but something that we need at particular times. I strongly remember my mother gazing at my face and saying: “Sit down, you look pale, are you getting your period? Here, I’ll make you some meat.” Maybe that’s just her cultural way, but it makes sense within my body. To this day, I can literally HEAR when my body craves meat, when it needs that extra sustenance. Kafta is one of the easiest ways to refuel. Can I just say, ladies, if you make this for your men they will think you are, by far, the best thing that every walked this earth. So let’s get onto it. Here’s a recipe for at least 10 Kafta. The ingredients: 1/2 lamb shoulder – trim the chunky fat off + dice up 1/2 lamb leg 1 bunch of parsley 2 brown onions Salt Lebanese 5 Spice How to: Place the onion and parsley in the food processor  Add the lamb. Whiz it up until it’s minced. (You might like to do this in two batches) Place the mixture into a bowl and mix in the spices and salt. Use your hands to really get into it! Shape into long sausages and thread onto skewers (pre-soak your bamboo skewers) Either BBQ or place under your grill – 15 – 20 minutes To serve: Slide each Kafta off the skewer. Serve with a big dollop of natural yoghurt and a sprinkle of Z’artar. Serve with a big green salad, tabouli or anything else you like. Keep it simple. These Kafta’s do all the talking. You can get fancy with it though – turn them into meatballs and make a delicious tomato based sauce to cook them it and serve with some brown rice or quinoa and lots of veggies. Just a note: you can ask your butcher to dice/mince up your meat to cut out the effort. You want to use a blend of lean and slightly fattier lamb to get a nice juicy Kafta, otherwise it’ll be too dry! Saha to you! Claire x Read more

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: SPICY FISH

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: SPICY FISH

Posted May 13, 2013

Let me introduce you to Samke Harra. AKA Spicy/Hot Fish. This is a pretty popular and well-known Middle Eastern dish, but I see it as ‘Dad’s Fish’. My dad is the master of this recipe and I always (and mostly only) remember my Dad making this for us. I’m so incredibly grateful for my parents love of good food. I’m even more grateful that BOTH of them have their specialty and signature dishes that not only are they great at cooking but that they LOVE to cook it. That love, I feel, is in every morsel that hits my lips and finding it’s way deeply into my body as pure nutrition. Now, you have to forgive me, the last time I made this dish I totally and utterly lost myself in the making and eating of it that I didn’t take too many pictures. I wish I had a photographer that would follow me around in my tiny kitchen – actually, that would make life very difficult! Anyways, I think this is by far one of the most tastiest dishes… ever. I get excited just writing about it! The first version below is the traditional Samke Harra recipe. It’s super easy and delicious. I decided to also include  a more jazzed up version below that I also like to make. It’s a TEENSY bit more time-consuming, but well worth it! The recipes are essentially the same with a few key changes. Version 1: The Easy One What you’ll need: 1 cup of parsley + corinader 1 teaspoon of dried chilli flakes or fresh chillis (more or less to taste) 1 cup of unhulled, organic tahini Juice of 1/2 lemons 1 garlic clove Water to break down the tahini Pepper to taste 2 fillets of fresh fish (I used Salmon here but Tuna, Dory, Barramundi, Snapper, Sea Bass or any white fish is great too) 1/2 cup Toasted Slivered Almonds or Pine Nuts  What to do: In a food processor add in all ingredients except the fish. Whiz away until you get a nice thick consistency, but add in water if it’s too goopy. Place fillets in a baking tray with lemon slices and sprinkle of coriander Place in the over at 180 degrees for around 20 minutes Steam or bake any greens you’d like on the side; silverbeet, kale, fennel + asparagus. For the last 5 minutes pour in the tahini sauce to cover the fish and cover with foil Serve with more fresh parsley, coriander, lemon and scattered almonds Version 2: The Nutty One What you’ll need: 1/2 cup of (activated) Walnuts 1/2 cup of almond meal 1 cup of parsley + coriander 1 teaspoon of dried chilli flakes or fresh chilli (more or less to taste) 1 cup of unhulled, organic tahini (black or white) Juice of two lemons 2 garlic clove Water to break down the tahini Pepper to taste 2 fillets of fresh fish (I used Salmon here but Tuna, Dory, Barramundi or any white fish is great too) What to do: In a food processor add in all ingredients, including the nuts, except the fish. Take the mixture and cover the fillets in a really thick layer of the nuts and herbs Wrap fillets in foil – make sure it’s an air filled pocket with lots of space for the fish to breath Place in the over at 180 degrees for around 20 minutes Get your greens/side dish ready Serve  – plate up your greens. Place a fillet on top with torn coriander and crushed walnuts and a wedge of lemon. There you have it. Delicious. Insanely healthy – all that protein and good fat and east. As we say in Arabic, SAHA (good health) to you! Eat and enjoy, Cx Images kindly borrowed from here, and here Read more

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: THE 100% VEGAN PERFECT PROTEIN MEAL

MIDDLE EAST MONDAY: THE 100% VEGAN PERFECT PROTEIN MEAL

Posted April 29, 2013

Today’s dish, Mujaddara, is a staple in Middle Eastern Cuisine. It’s a staple because it’s easy, cheap to make, veggie AND it’s a perfect protein. Looking at the picture of this dish you might find it weird to hear that our eyes light up anytime my mum tells us (my sisters, brother and I) that she’s made Mujaddara and it’s in the fridge. It’s true though. It’s one of the most basic dishes to make but there is something about it that is so complete nurturing and satisfying. Maybe because it’s a complete protein – the combination of brown rice and lentils make this a perfect protein – which basically means you get all essential amino acids that the body cannot make on its own. On its own it is complete and whole. We tend to eat Mujaddara as an accompaniment, like we do with most dishes, but mostly I just love this on it’s own. It’s stupidly cheap to make – it was probably a dish first born from poverty, but I feel rich when I eat this. Rich in nutrients and in love – because it’s usually made by my mum, who truly cooks with love. Not to mention all the other Lebanese mammas out there that see cooking and feeding their tribe as an honour, a way of life and an expression of compassion and kindness. It’s also not a very pretty look dish, but not much is in Middle Eastern Cuisine. But who cares, right? Apparently I did, ALOT. It’s bizarre to remember that as a child I used to shun Mujaddara. It wasn’t so much the taste but that it was a brown, boring looking blob. Children are so fussy. Mum use to sneak this into my diet in lebanese bread wraps or fancied up with other more exciting looking things. Now I’m excited to eat this just as it is! Ok, so let’s get cooking. What you’ll need: 1 cup dry lentils, rinsed 2 cups water 1 teaspoon pink salt 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon diced garlic 3/4 cup brown rice, rinsed 3/4 cup water 1 teaspoon pink salt 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/4 cup vegetable oil 3 white onions, sliced into 1/4-inch rings How to make Mujaddara: Pre-soak your lentils for as long as you can Bring the lentils to boil in a pot of water. As soon as it boils take it off the heat and rinse – this is how I ensure lentils don’t cause any gas/bloating. It’s an extra precaution I learnt from my mum. Combine the lentils, 2 cups water, 1 teaspoon salt, the cumin, and garlic  in a pot over medium heat; bring to a simmer, reduce heat to low, and cook until the lentils begin to soften, 20 to 30 minutes. Stir the rice, 3/4 cup water, 1 teaspoon salt, and the olive oil into the lentils. Cover the pot and continue cooking until the lentils and rice are tender, about 40 minutes. Heat the cooking oil in a pan over medium heat; cook the onions in the oil until browned, 7 to 10 minutes. Spread the onions over the rice and lentil mixture to serve. If you want to get a little fancy I add in some coriander and mint at the end, diced organic tomatoes and big dollop of homemade yoghurt! This is such an awesome staple to have in the fridge when you are too exhausted to cook – it’s satisfying, filling and nutrient dense. Saha to you + enjoy! Claire x Read more


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