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Category: Recipes


CHICKEN SAN CHOY BAU

CHICKEN SAN CHOY BAU

Posted March 12, 2012

Last week I was really keen for something fresh yet hearty. I was also craving something chinese inspired… and seeing as greasy take-away wasn’t really an option I headed to the fridge. Seeing as I’d just eceived a food connect delivery I found everything I needed to make San Choy Bau. It just popped into my head and once I had decided to make this I was pretty excited. It was exactly what I was craving. Fresh, crunchy, zingy, a little spicy and wholesome. I had a few requests for the recipe after posting it on instagram (find me: claireoyoga). So here it is! What you’ll need (for two people) 2 free-range + organic chicken breasts 1/2 red capsicum 1 brown onion 1/2 bunch of spring onions 1/4 cup coriander 1 inch of ginger 2 tbls tamari/shoyu 2tbls rice wine 2 tbls coconut oil 1 red chilli 2 garlic cloves 8 medium cos lettuce leaves 5-6 shitake mushrooms I used a mini food processor to do all the dicing. Totally optional, but makes like super easy! What to do: First mince the chicken in the food processor (After cleaning it) I then diced the onion Heat coconut oil in a deep pan Sweat the onion off and added in the chicken on low for 2-3 minutes Add in diced garlic, ginger and chilli for 2 minutes Add in diced shitake mushrooms Add in rice wine + tamari Add in diced red capsicum, spring onions for 2 minutes Take off heat and stir in coriander Meanwhile, rinse and clean lettuce leaves     Side salad: Steam Kale or Silverbeet spinach  Dry off Toss in juice of one lemon + oil of your choice (olive/coconut/sesame) Toss sprouts (chef’s choice!) Season with himalayan rock salt + black pepper Voila – serve it up rustic style in the pan and dig in!     Enjoy + saha to you.   Signing off with an exhale.    Pause. Listen. Live.   Claire x  Read more

CHIA SEED DESSERTS

CHIA SEED DESSERTS

Posted March 07, 2012

I was recently at the Byron Spirit Festival with two of my closest friends, Nadia from Yoga Village  and Emma Seibold from Body Barre. Yep, my friends are very talented ladies. We were so thrilled to be together, doing the things we love to do… get our hippie on. Mala beads anyone?   We sipped on green smoothies daily after yoga. We hunted through organic health food shops to find basil soap, coconut shampoo and nag champa incense. I had an Aura photo done – will blog on this – and discovered how open my mooladhara chakra was! (Shit yogis say!) We chilled horizontally in a ‘sacred goddess tent’ and sang along to traditional kirtan in the chai tent. We stayed up past yogi-hour (9:30pm!) to hear some amazing live acts – Deva Premal, Yeshe, Nomadic Voices, Mother Maya. We went to yoga classes. But what excited us most? Besides the yoga, the weather and being with friends? Well… the food of course. We continually walked past stands with sprouted gluten free muesli, sugar free chocolate slices or iced chai tea and cake.   What got my yoga pants in a knot was the delicious chia porridge. Now I’ve known that these deceiving little seeds pack more punch than one would think. I have blogged about chia seeds and their nutritional wealth before. I add them to smoothies, to my muesli and salads but I hadn’t quite thought of a whole dish mostly of chia seeds.   So, here I present to you a variety of recipes that call for chia seeds which I found at the Byron Spirit Festival. These are delicious enough to eat as a dessert, or even breakfast or snack!   Raw, Vegan Chia Seed Congee   What you’ll need:   1/2 cup chia seeds 1/3 cup pomegranate seeds 1/3 cup finely chopped coconut flesh (if you can get it) 1 tbls coconut oil 1 tbls coconut crunch 1 tbls coconut flakes 1 ½ cup of nut milk (almond, walnut) Cinnamon to taste Freshly grated ginger to taste What to do:   Mix all together! Let it sit for at least 15 minutes (go and do something else!). You’ll come back to an almost jelly like porridge bowl, the chia seeds absorb and expand in liquid.   Frozen Chia Seed dessert   What you’ll need: 1 cup frozen blueberries (you can use any berries you like!) ½ cup banana (frozen first if possible) 3 tbls chia seeds 1 tbls coconut oil 1 tbls acai powder ½ cup coconut water water What to do: Blend all ingredients. Let it sit whilst the chia seeds expand. Put in freezer for no longer than an hour. Enjoy a nice cooling, totally raw, sugar free, healthy dessert that is refreshing and yummo! Blows icy poles out of the water. Enjoy and saha to you. Signing off with an exhale. Pause. Listen. Live Cx  Read more

EAT SEASONAL + KEEP IT LOCAL

EAT SEASONAL + KEEP IT LOCAL

Posted February 29, 2012

I’m more than happy to admit that despite growing up with a healthy knowledge of whole foods that I wasn’t 100% sure what fruits and veggies grew in what season. Do you? I mean, besides knowing a few major ones such as summer brings mangoes and cherries are hot property in early summer at Christmas time, I don’t think I could’ve told you what eating seasonally really meant! Well… that has changed. I’ve made a point of seeking, buying and eating seasonally and therefore locally over the last year. It’s harder and takes a little dedication because it’s so much easier to nip into woollies to buy up your standard go-to veg. But, it’s been worth it. It’s worth it for a few reasons: 1) Support local farmers – not the international marketplace – our $$ go to the families working OUR land 2) Sustainable – reducing our carbon footprint caused by shipping produce from thousands of miles away 3) Health – eating fresh is best. Less use of chemicals to ripen produce picked before it’s fully matured, which also means more nutrient dense food 4) Creative cooking – when you cook seasonal you get to experiment with new recipes instead of cooking the same things all year round 5) It tastes better! So I give to you an easy reference for eating seasonally for February and March which I was lucky enough to find in a diary called the Foodies’ Diary. I’ll cover the other months as they come around. FEBRUARY/MARCH Fruit: apples bananas blackberries blueberries boysenberries figs grapes guavas honeydew melon kiwifruit lemons + limes loganberries lycées mangoes mangosteens nashi nectarines nuts papayas passionfruit peaches pears plums pomegranates rambutans raspberries rhubarb rockmelons strawberries tamarillos valencia oranges watermelons Vegetables: asian greens avocados beans borlotti beans capsicums celery chillies cucumbers daikon eggplants fennel leeks lettuce okra onions peas potatoes pumpkins radishes shallots silverbeet spinach squash sweet corn sweet potatoes tomatoes zucchini zucchini flowers Read more

PATTY CAKE PATTY CAKE! BAKE ME A (QUINOA PATTY) CAKE…

PATTY CAKE PATTY CAKE! BAKE ME A (QUINOA PATTY) CAKE…

Posted February 24, 2012

I love Quinoa. It’s such a special little seed. Pack with 8 essential amino acids (protein) that our body needs and cannot make. Not only that, it’s delicious, versatile.  I also love to cook and experiment. I find it therapeutic but I also love the challenge of trying to create something that I never have before. So, this week I googled Quinoa recipes and found a few on patties. I like to pick and choose elements of recipes that I like and ditch the bits (or ingredients) I don’t! The result? Yummy, very filling, nutritious and super easy Quinoa patties. I made these and steamed veggies (amongst running around the house doing other things) in 40 minutes as I knew I needed to cook, eat and run out the door to go to a Jivamukti restorative yoga class with my beautiful friend Valeria. See her blog here!  Enjoy and saha to you!  Ingredients: 2 cups cooked quinoa– red or white  1/2 cup cooked chickpeas + 2 tbsp water 3 – 4 tbsp chia seeds with ½ cup of water (you can use eggs if you prefer) 1 tbsp shoyu/tamari OR Bragg’s Liquid Aminos 1 tsp dried basil leaf 1/2 tsp dried thyme leaf 1/2 tsp cumin seed 1 tsp coriander seed 1/2 tsp paprika 1/2 tsp crushed garlic 2 tbsp coconut flour Salt & pepper to taste 3 spring onions – diced handful of parsley ½ red capsicum – diced ½ red onion Dash of chilli flakes Butter/Ghee/Coconut oil What to do: In a fry pan heat 1 tbls of butter/ghee/coconut oil Add the cumin, coriander, paprika and garlic, stirring, 5 min. Transport all ingredients to a food processor and blend. Add more water if needed – you want the mixture to be a little wet/sticky so that it stays moulded and doesn’t dry out.    If you have time, chill the mixture for an hour or so before forming into patties, for a firmer patty. Divide the mix into 8 equal portions and form into 3 inch patties – I just used a large soup spoon and my hands! If they are too big they won’t cook through.    Lay evenly on baking paper in a baking tray. Bake at 180 degrees for 20 – 30minutes To freeze uncooked, place the patties between sheets of wax paper in a container freeze. Serve with fresh yoghurt, slices of tomato (maybe make your own tomato relish?), lots of greens on the side. Or even with eggs for breakfast? Do you cook with Quinoa? If you have any fun recipes please share! Signing off with an exhale. Pause. Listen. Live Cx Read more

DAIRY ALTERNATIVES + ALMOND MILK RECIPE

DAIRY ALTERNATIVES + ALMOND MILK RECIPE

Posted February 22, 2012

I recently posted about dairy and tried to provide you with a little insight into the very confusing world of little lactose friend. What I didn’t do is talk much about the alternatives. Obviously, you get the vibe from my earlier blog post that I am a little keen on pastured, raw, cow’s milk – unhomogenised and unpasteurised. Sadly it isn’t legal in Australia. And although you can find it I do get asked a lot about dairy alternatives – mostly from clients calling me from the supermarket aisle, baffled as to what to choose!   The choices out there are a little startlng these days  Soy     Oat  Rice  Almond  Cow’s Milk – light, skim, full (and more!) Goat’s Milk Of these, the ones I would definitely avoid (if you are consuming dairy regularly) – Soy + Cow’s.  What’s the issue with soy? Stay tuned – I’m going to write about that soon! But know this, soy is packed with phytoestrogens. The phytoestrogens in soy bind to estrogen receptors creating serious hormonal imbalances resulting in infertility, miscarriage, lowered libido, precocious puberty in girls, hypospadias* and testicular cancer in boys.   After hearing that I don’t blame you if you rush out to buy up on Oat/Rice/Almond but buyer beware. That evil vice we are always fronting up against – sugar – can be found in a lot of the processed varieties out there, even the ones in health food shops.   If you are going to purchase try to find one with no added sugar, preservatives, flavours or colours. And check the ingredients, if the list is long and full of ‘unnecessary’ items, keep looking! If you can get your hands on goat’s milk this is a great alternative – a lot of local health food shops stock goat’s milk these days. But, there is also a really easy solution – make your own!   Almond milk is so easy to make, it becomes a little embarrassing to buy it! And, if you buy a big 1kg bag of almonds you can use half to make 2 litres of Almond Milk and the remaining 500g as a snack – don’t forget to soak + dehydrate your nuts first! Check out this post.   If you are keen try this easy Almond Milk recipe that I learnt from doing some online research – thank you google and the many bloggers out there that share information!   What you’ll need: 1 kg of Almonds Filtered Water Himalayan Rock Salt 2 – 3 Seeded (pre-soaked) dates (optional) Muslin cloth or fine mesh sieve Large class bottle What to do: In a large pot/bowl pour in your 1 kg of Almonds, add water and a teaspoon of salt. Let it sit overnight for at least 8 hours. In the aim, drain and rinse. Separate out 500g of your Almonds and place on a baking tray in the over, 60 degrees for 8 – 10 hours.   Use the rest for your Almond Milk! Place 2 cups at a time into your blender. Add in 5 – 6 cups of filtered water. Blend! Let it blend until it’s really smooth. Pour into your sieve/muslin cloth or bag over a big pot and let it drain. You can get more out but pushing through the sieve with a spoon or squeezing the cloth/bag. The left over mixture is your own homemade Almond Meal – I keep this in containers in the freezer and use for cookies, baking, adding to muesli or smoothies. Once you have your drained milk place it back into the blender and add in the dates. Blend away to mix it all well. The dates are a natural sugar to sweetened the milk. If you want you can add fresh vanilla pods/extract or even Stevia, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, cacao – anything really. Pour into a clean glass bottle and store in the fridge for 4-5 days.     Drink in your coffee, tea, smoothies, or on its own!     Enjoy and saha to you. Signing off with an exhale   Pause. Listen. Live   Claire x  Read more

MY DAD, HIS HERBS + MY DINNER

MY DAD, HIS HERBS + MY DINNER

Posted February 15, 2012

There are a few things I learnt from my father. Some are lessons I fought hard against, others I didn’t even realise I was learning until years later. But when it comes to food – good quality meat and fish products, whole foods, fresh vegetables, healthy oils, homemade remedies – I definitely attribute these lessons to my father and give credit where credit is due.    Having owned a organic health food manufacturing business (It still exists today – check out Carwari) that specialised in middle eastern products such as Tahini, Halva and more, it’s no wonder that my dad was exposed to so much information about food that he shared with us.   But it goes further back than that. My dad (in more ways that one!) maintained so many traditions from his motherland – Syria. Today I’m so utterly grateful for this that it almost makes me want to cry!   Over the last couple of years since my dad retired he has been focusing his love and energy on the unruly back garden where I grew up. Now, he’s not making it look pretty, by any means. It’s still filled with random bits of old furniture, bushes overgrowing everywhere and a whole lot of mess. But within this seemingly messy piece of wild land many gems are grown.   In my parents garden you can find an olive tree, that still produces beautiful big green olives! There are mandarin trees, macadamia trees, a lemon tree… somewhere. And more aloe vera than you can shake a stick out – which was born from one tiny plant that I bought when I was 11 at a school fete!   The garden has also had some newbies arrive on the scene. We now have Lebanese Zucchini, eggplant, tomatoes, celery, french beans and watercress. I spent an afternoon planting veggies with my dad. It was such an awesome bonding experience that I plan to repeat it! Whenever I visit he takes me on a guided tour to present the progress of our veggie patch project.   On the herb front, we have gangbuster growth. To name a few: Basil, Mint, Chives, Oregano, Rocket, Parslane…   You can see in this picture my lovely (he looks tired here!) dad carrying a woven flat basket of herbs freshly trimmed.     Whenever I visit I get loaded up with a big bunch which either becomes dinner or I ferment them – olive oil, salt and water cover the herbs in a jar which live in the fridge. I add them on sourdough with fresh yoghurt or stirred through a veggie dish.       Armed with these fresh herbs I decided to cook up a yummy dinner.      Roasted veggies and quinoa with fresh herbs, boiled egg and coconut crunch.   What you’ll need: Any veggies to roast – capsicum, red onion, zucchini, eggplant, pumpkin  Fresh tomatoes x 2 Big bowl of mixed herbs (go crazy, choose fresh and be creative!) 2 eggs 2 tbls Coconut oil Chill Flakes Pepper 2 Garlic cloves 1/3 cup Coconut Crunch  (leftovers from air-dried coconut flesh once oil has been removed) 1/2 cup Quinoa 2 tbls Chia Seeds What to do: Dice veggies + toss in olive oil, chilli flakes, garlic and pepper to taste Bake in oven at 180 degrees for 20 – 30 minutes Meanwhile – boil to eggs (runny or hard boiled is fine!) Prepare Quinoa – simmer down in pot of water – you can flavour here if you want to. Rise and chop herbs (if they are from your garden be careful of spiders/bugs!) Toss herbs, chia seeds, coconut crunch, veggies, tomatoes and quinoa Season + drizzle a little extra coconut oil on top. Toss to coat Peel and place two eggs on top   It was good. Maybe because I felt connected to my father’s hard work – growing the herbs, tending and caring for them. And I’m sure it was because I knew the source. You can’t get any more local or organic than from your own backyard!   If you haven’t got a backyard maybe consider getting a little balcony veggie or herb patch going. It’s possible in a small space – and will encourage you to eat from there frequently.    Here’s to my dad and his delicious, fresh herbs!    Enjoy. Saha to you!   Signing off with an exhale.   Pause. Listen. Live   Cx   Read more

RECIPE – HEALTHY PAD THAI WITH SOBA NOODLES

RECIPE – HEALTHY PAD THAI WITH SOBA NOODLES

Posted February 13, 2012

My god, I love food. Really, I do! I love trying new flavours, I love feeling satisfied by the process of creating a meal from whole, fresh food. Mostly, I love sharing it with the people I love.   I also dig it when someone tries a recipe I’ve shared and they love it too! Job done.   At Yoga Village (where I teach) we are running a detox throughout the month of February.I was fortunate enough to help create the detox program and run the kick-off Wellness Workshop to the enrolled detoxers.   I recently heard positive feedback about the recipe below which was included in the detox meal plan. This recipe is a tweaked version of one received through my studies. Yep, I studied at a pretty awesome school that makes being healthy super easy with lots of recipes and resources.    Now, this recipe is SOO delicious with an unbelievable sauce that it almost feels naughty. But it’s NOT. It’s a dream for veggies and surprisingly meat eaters think this is the bees knees as well. (Still don’t get that saying – what’s so cool about Bees Knees?)   So, enough talking. Enjoy this as a really healthy and satisfying dinner or even for lunch the next day at work!   Saha to you!     What you’ll need:  3 tbls natural peanut butter (ground peanuts – found in health food shops) 1 block of tempeh or organic tofu 1 bunch Kale  1 bunch Asaparagus 1 packet of soba noodles 1 teaspoon dried chilli ¼ cup of shoyu/tamari, rice wine and mirin ¼  cup of water 1 thumb sized portion of fresh ginger root, grated 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 lemon   What to do:   1.    Place tempeh/tofu between paper towels with a chopping board resting above to squeeze out excess water 2.    Prepare soba noodles as per instructions 3.    In blender/food processor combine peanut butter, shoyu/tamari, ginger, rice wine,  mirin, chilli, water (to thin out mixture).        2.  Dice vegetables 4.    Heat coconut oil and fry tempeh/tofu, add in veggies and noodles – toss to coat 5.    Pour peanut marinade 6.    Serve with lemon   Variations: Try chicken and add in bean sprouts and egg for a variation on pad thai   Signing off with an exhale.   Pause. Listen. Live.   Cx  Read more

MY LOVE OF AYURVEDA AND 9 HEALING FOODS

MY LOVE OF AYURVEDA AND 9 HEALING FOODS

Posted January 25, 2012

I love Ayurveda. I’ve mentioned it a few times on this blog, but probably not enough for anyone to realise how passionate I am about this ancient system of medicine. Although, I don’t really think that the word ‘medicine’ explains this system well enough. Medicine implies that Ayurveda is simply about healing the body when it is ill, riddled with disease or is out of balance. However, from what I’ve studied, Ayurveda is mostly about bringing the body, mind and soul into perfect balance to achieve perfect health in order to prevent disease and illness. Preventative, not just curative. Ayurveda literally translates to ‘life knowledge’… This straight away implies a sense of ownership towards ones life (body/mind/spirit) through knowledge, education, understanding – not just on a scientific level which modern medicine covers so well – but mostly on a personal, internal level of awareness. Understanding, knowing and working with who you are, what you need and accepting that you are 100% individual with unique requirements. Treating you not the disease is the main objective of Ayurveda. Recently I shared some information about Ayurveda with a client who loves to discover and uncover new things. We figured out, that like me, she is a Vata Dosha . This is her prakruti – her nature. Her own bio-individuality, which helps her understand the foods, lifestyle, seasons, exercise and more that will either bring her into balance or in contract, throw her out of balance. The most exciting aspect for me, when sharing this with my client, is her realisation that a lot of the elements that balance or imbalance a Vata are spot on for her. I know when I first discovered Ayurveda it made so much sense to me – a light-bulb moment in fact. I also felt reassured that the odd things about me (e.g. I go a little mad when I’m stuck outside in the wind) are actually key points of difference within my dosha.   I’ve been so focused on my business – The Wellness Project – and nurturing it to grow that I had let my attention to Ayurveda slip. I had to – that’s part of finding balance. Something has to give. However, working with my client has re-ignited my love affair with Ayurveda. Studying Ayurveda back on my list of ‘things to do’ for 2013! However, I did also realise that despite the lack of focus on Ayurveda (studying/reading about it) I had slowly incorporated so many elements of this amazing healing science into my life. From a lifestyle perspective: o   I now rise with the sun (it positively charges my mood and energy levels for the entire day!) o  I regularly self-massage with sesame oil, particularly when I’m feeling anxious and displaced. o   I stick to schedules – it removes that sense of uncertainty I feel when my life is too haphazardly thrown together. o   I meditate to calm my floaty, erratic, constantly moving Vata mind When it comes to foods there are a few easy to get items that are deemed as healers in Ayurveda. And I’ve made sure that they are frequently invited into my kitchen! Here are a few for you that energise and rejuvenate your body, whilst encouraging repair. 1) Ghee (clarified butter) – I cook with coconut oil except when the flavour doesn’t suit the meal. Then I look to grass-fed Ghee. It is so moorish! It is grounding, calms the nerves and aids digestion. It is also a good fat that aids the transportation of nutrients from other (healthy!) foods.                                   2) Ginger – promotes good digestion and is considered ‘the universal medicine’. Ayurveda recommends eating a thin slice of fresh ginger sprinkled with salt (I recommend Himalayan) and a squeeze lemon juice half an hour before eating to help with digestion. I use it to make ice tea in winter, warming post-dinner tea in winter, I bake with it, add it to my quinoa salads and stir-fries 3) Mung Beans – a nutritional powerhouse – one of the best legumes for digestibility. Sprout them for salads or use in soups, dhals, curries and stews. They are also particularly health-giving when mixed with brown rice or other grains.  4) Lemons – I go through a kilo a week! Lemon in hot water is a daily ritual, lemon on salads, fish, squeezed into my bircher… everything! Lemons stimulate digestion. 5) Yoghurt – nourishing, refreshing and vital. Having learnt how to make it from my mum I make a batch every week from raw, whole milk (check out this post for more info!). I use it in my bircher muesli, add it to smoothies, spread it on break with fresh herbs + olive oil and I use it as the base for many sauces and dressings. Traditionally, Ayurveda recommends drinking it as a  Lassi. You can prepare this by mixing one part yoghurt into two parts water. It is an excellent nutritive digestive aid, taken during or after a meal. You can flavor lassi either with raw honey (maple is fine!) ground cardamom, cinnamon or add fruit. 6) Seasonal fruits – I know we are all afraid of sugar, but fruits with their fibrous skins are nutritive and purifying. Seasonal fruits should be completely ripe for reaping maximum nutritional benefits 7) Almonds – nourish the heart with healthy fats. Ayurveda, even 5000 years ago before scientific labs, understood that Almonds (and nuts) contain a toxic outer layer (phytic acid). So the recommendation to soak and dehydrate almonds is age-old. Strength, energy, vitality – all from the nutrient dense Almond! Dates and Figs – Medjool Dates and dried Turkish Fish. When I’m ready to eat them I soak them in a little more to make them more digestible and store in the fridge. I remember my dad saying they are a brilliant source of energy. Ayurveda says the same! They also help to build tissue. Chuck them in smoothies, great for raw […] Read more

SAMKE HARRE – Spicy Salmon with Tahini and Nut Crust

SAMKE HARRE – Spicy Salmon with Tahini and Nut Crust

Posted January 11, 2012

This is by far one of the most tastiest dishes… ever. I get excited just writing about it! Samke Harre is a middle eastern specialty. Samke means fish and Harre means hot/spicy in Arabic. My parents make a version of this traditional middle eastern recipe. I’ve changed it up a bit after reading a variety of recipes online. It is quite decadent, but I kid you not when I say nothing in this is unhealthy – in fact, it is nourishing and life-giving. It’s simple. Once you’ve done the prep you can literally walk away from the kitchen and come back when it’s done! I love baking in the oven. What you’ll need: 1/2 cup of (activated) Walnuts 1/2 cup of almond meal (I use the leftover bits when I make almond milk) 1 cup of parsley + corinader 1 teaspoon of dried chilli flakes or fresh chillis (more or less to taste) 1 cup of unhulled, organic tahini (black or white) Juice of one lemon 1 garlic clover Water to break down the tahini Pepper to taste 2 fillets of fresh fish (I used Salmon here but Tuna, Dory, Barramundi or any white fish is great too) Sides: Silverbeet Asparagus Coriander Walnuts    What to do: In a food processor add in all ingredients except the fish. Whiz away until you get a nice thick consistency, but add in water if it’s too goopy. Take the mixture and cover the fillets in a really thick layer Wrap fillets in foil – make sure it’s an air filled pocket with lots of space for the fish to breath Place in the over at 180 degrees for around 20 minutes Steam the silverbeet + asparagus – this should only take 5 minutes. Ensure the asparagus stays nice and crunchy Serve  – plate up the silverbeet (toss with lots of lemon juice first!). Place a fillet on top, top with asparagus stalks, torn coriander and crushed walnuts and a wedge of lemon. Saha!   Signing off with an exhale. Pause. Listen. Live Cx Read more


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